Notes

Isaiah 21-24

I apologize for this post taking so long for me to get it out to you. I went on vacation, and when I got back, went through some personal stuff. On top of those things, Isaiah is getting pretty difficult to follow. When exactly do the events described here (that aren’t prophecy about the future) fit into the overall timeline of the Bible? Isaiah also jumps around constantly to different ancient localities and his prophecies are very cryptic. I typically have to break everything down into bullet points in order to try and understand what’s going on.

Isaiah 21

Isaiah has a vision concerning the “Desert by the Sea.” An invader comes in from the desert, but the city’s officers are just idling when they should be getting ready to defend. God tells Isaiah to set up a lookout, which Isaiah does. Eventually, a rider pulls up to the lookout and tells him that Babylon has been defeated.

Isaiah has another vision concerning a place called “Dumah.” All that is really said about this vision is this cryptic passage, “Someone calls to me from Seir, ‘Watchman, what is left of the night? Watchman, what is left of the night?’ The watchman replies, ‘Morning is coming, but also the night. If you would ask, then ask; and come back yet again.’”

Finally, he has another vision concerning “Arabia.” In the vision, Isaiah calls on the Dedanites to bring water for the fugitives who are fleeing from battle. Later, God tells Isaiah that within the year, “all the pomp of Kedar will come to an end.”

Isaiah 22

This one is a vision concerning the “Valley of Vision.” In this vision, Isaiah’s people are captured in war, as the nation’s leaders just fled from a battle without putting up a fight. Isaiah credits this defeat to the fact that the city did not spend enough time looking to God for protection. Next, God sends Isaiah to chastise a man named Shebna who is in charge of the palace. God says that he will remove Shebna from office and will place a man named Eliakim in his place.

Isaiah 23

Here we have a vision concerning “Tyre.” In this vision, God destroys a place called Tyre in order to “bring low the pride of all glory and to humble all who are renowned on the earth.” It says that Tyre will be forgotten for 70 years, but then God will allow the place to be rebuilt, although the profits from it will all be set aside for “…those who live before the LORD, for abundant food and fine clothes.” (I found it kind of odd that the profits would be used for “fine clothes” for the believers. What about the poor etc.?)

Isaiah 24

This vision is pretty grim. In this one, God devastates the world and scatters its inhabitants, killing most everyone. He will do this because human being have disobeyed his laws, violated his statutes, and broken the everlasting covenant. 

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1 Notes

Isaiah 11-20

Isaiah 11

Isaiah’s vision continued, and I’m assuming this is another premonition about Jesus and the end times. In the vision, “the Root of Jesse” has received the spirit from God to have great wisdom and understanding, and this man becomes a judge over the people. Isaiah predicts that the nations will flock to this man and there will be a time of peace where, “The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them. The cow will feed with the bear, their young will lie down together, and the lion will eat straw like the ox. The infant will play near the hole of the cobra, and the young child put his hand into the viper’s nest.”

Isaiah 12

Isaiah says that when that day comes, everyone will praise God and sing to him, proclaiming his name to the world.

Isaiah 13

Isaiah has a vision of the “day of the LORD” in which God returns to earth with an army to “make the land desolate” and to “destroy the sinners.” When this occurs, everyone will be deathly afraid, and the stars, sun, and moon won’t shine any light. God says that he will cause an enemy nation to have “no mercy on infants nor will they look with compassion on children.” Why would God want that? 

Isaiah 14

Chapter 14 features the only appearance of the word (or name) “Lucifer” in the Bible. Although Isaiah was talking about a human king in this passage, I can see why later Christian tradition would start calling Satan “Lucifer.” The passage reads, “You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of the sacred mountain. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.’ But you are brought down to the grave, to the depths of the pit.”

Isaiah 15

Isaiah sees a vision concerning the nation of Moab, that some of its cities will be destroyed in one night, and that its inhabitants will go out in public weeping and mourning for their loss. 

Isaiah 16

Is this another prophecy concerning Jesus, In love a throne will be established; in faithfulness a man will sit on it— one from the house of David— one who in judging seeks justice and speeds the cause of righteousness”?

Isaiah 17

Okay, these are starting to get a little dull.

Isaiah 18

Isaiah is hard to follow in the sense that every chapter seems to be about a different ancient place or culture, and about the complicated relationships between those ancient places or cultures, and on top of that, there is cryptic prophecy that’s hard to understand. Take this passage from this chapter for example.  “At that time gifts will be brought to the LORD Almighty from a people tall and smooth-skinned, from a people feared far and wide, an aggressive nation of strange speech, whose land is divided by rivers— the gifts will be brought to Mount Zion, the place of the Name of the LORD Almighty.” Who are those “tall and smooth-skinned” people and why are they significant? Why are they bringing gifts to God and why is that important? I feel lost.

Isaiah 19

Isaiah has another vision, this time concerning Egypt. It essentially says that God will damage Egypt so much that the Egyptians will know God and for some reason want to then start worshipping him.

Isaiah 20

God commanded Isaiah to walk around completely naked for three years to protest the nations of Egypt and Cush. How would walking around naked get anything accomplished and why would God want Isaiah to do that? 

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Notes

Susanna (susanna@plousia.org) submitted:

Not sure if this is the place to do this, but I don’t see a contact link and the “ask” form won’t let me include a link. I recently came across your blog and find it fascinating. I’m curious to see where you’ll end up. One post in particular really struck me, so much so that I wrote a blog post about it: http://plousia.org/2014-07-08/why-do-many-christians-not-read-or-understand-bible. I’d be interested to hear your opinion if you read it and care to share. Thanks, and take care.

Thank you! I’m going to send you a private message but also wanted to post this on the blog in case others wanted to read your post. It’s a good read. 

Notes

Isaiah 1-10

Isaiah 1

The Bible took a break from describing the history of Israel/Judah over the last few books, but it seems like we’re getting back into the timeline now. We are introduced to a man named Isaiah, who claims that he’s had a vision that concerns the nation of Judah. Isaiah’s vision has a similar theme to most of the books thus far in the Bible: the people of the nation have forsaken God and turned to evil ways, and God is very angry about it. God has become “weary” of the people’s “meaningless” sacrifices, implores them to “seek justice,” and tells them that if they are “willing and obedient” that they can become successful, but if not, God will avenge himself on them.

Isaiah 2

As Isaiah’s vision continues he sees what I assume is an end time premonition, where in the day God returns to earth, “The arrogance of man will be brought low and the pride of men humbled.” When that day comes, Isaiah claims “Men will flee to caves in the rocks and to holes in the ground from dread of the LORD.” After this, Isaiah sees the mountain of God’s temple being established in the earth as the most significant mountain in the world. God will apparently be physically in the temple that is upon the mountain and people will walk up it in order to learn from God his wisdom. From that mountain seat, God will judge nations and settle disputes. When this comes to pass, Isaiah says that everyone “…will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation will not take up sword against nation, nor will they train for war anymore.”

Isaiah 3

Due to Judah’s disobedience to God, Isaiah says that imminent danger is upon them. God is about to take away their supplies of food and water, make their government crumble in on itself, make the promiscuous women become bald and lose their beauty, and make most of the men die in battle.

Isaiah 4

In the day described in the previous chapter in which most of the men die in battle, it says here that the number of men left will eventually become so few in number that “seven women will take hold of one man” and be okay with sharing him amongst all seven.

Isaiah 5

Isaiah sings a song about a vineyard to illustrate a point, which is that God looked to Israel and Judah to be his chosen ones, but instead, got a nation of evil people. If these evil ways continue, God decrees that their nation will come to ruin.

Isaiah 6

Isaiah had another vision wherein he saw God seated on a throne, and above him were these flying creatures called “seraphs.” Upon seeing this, Isaiah became afraid for his life because of his sins, but one of the seraphs brought a burning coal from an altar and pressed it against his lips (ouch!), which apparently atoned for his sin. God then asked, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” to which Isaiah responded, “Here am I. Send me!” God then told Isaiah to go and make the people of the nation not be able to understand the truth, “Otherwise they might…understand…and turn and be healed.” This was supposed to continue until the cities of the nation were in ruins and the “the land is utterly forsaken.” Am I the only one that thinks it’s a little cruel that God wants everyone to not be able to understand the truth and “be healed” just so that he can destroy them? Wouldn’t he want them to come to the truth? 

Isaiah 7

The nation of Aram attacked Jerusalem, but their first march was unsuccessful. Aram then allied itself with a nation called Ephraim and made plans to attack Jerusalem again, which made Jerusalem’s king Ahaz fearful. God sent Isaiah to assure Ahaz that they would not be defeated by Aram if they stood “firm in [their] faith.” God also gave them a sign, that a “…virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.” Matthew later quotes this verse in Matthew 1:22-23 as being a prophecy that Jesus allegedly fulfills, but from the text here, we’re talking about an event that is a sign from God to Ahaz to assure him that he personally will not be defeated by the nation of Aram. Jesus allegedly wasn’t born until 700 years after this prophecy was written, so how could this prophecy for Ahaz’s sake be compatible with Jesus’ story?

Isaiah 8

A prophetess gave birth to a son and God declared his name, which was “Maher-Shalal-Has-Baz” (wow). Before the boy knows how to talk, God said that the king of Assyria would take the plunder of the cities of Damascus and Samaria, and his power would flow over Judah like a river.  

Isaiah 9

Here I believe another prophecy of Jesus is written (correct me if I’m wrong), “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and peace there will be no end. He will reign on David’s throne and over his kingdom, establishing and upholding it with justice and righteousness from that time on and forever.” 

Isaiah 10

God says that he will punish the king of Assyria for thinking that he accomplished all that he did by his own hand. And hopefully, through that, his chosen people will come to “truly rely” on God again.

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Notes

Isaiah

Isaiah 1-10

Isaiah 11-20

Isaiah 21-24

Isaiah 25-30

Isaiah 31-40

Isaiah 41-50

Isaiah 51-60

Isaiah 61-66

Final Thoughts on the Book of Isaiah

Notes

In the Catholic Bible this book is often called "Song of Songs" and it made it in the final cut because sex is meant to be holy and good. It's not evil. It's also meant to express the love that God has for His people. Pope St. John Paul II says that the least imperfect example of God's love for his people is that of a husband and a wife.

Asked by bannerofthecross

2 Notes

Final Thoughts on the Book of Song of Solomon

Song of Solomon is unique thus far in the Bible for not only being strictly a love story between two people, and not mentioning God anywhere within it, but it’s also sexual in nature, which left me wondering how this got included in the “final draft,” if you will, of the Bible. 

We learn that the person called “Lover” in the story is Solomon, but never learn the name of the girl. She is known simply as the “Beloved.” The two lovers continually talk in poetic longing for each other, and some of the lines are loving like, “Strengthen me with raisins, refresh me with apples, for I am faint with love,” but others get a little more sexual like, “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth,” or “Your stature is like that of the palm, and your breasts like clusters of fruit. I said, “I will climb the palm tree; I will take hold of its fruit,” and her responding by inviting him to taste her “choice fruits” etc.

My problem with the story is that there isn’t much plot to go by. How did the two originally meet? Why is their love forbidden and why do they have to meet in secret? When I got to the end of Song of Solomon, I couldn’t help but be a little disappointed. I couldn’t really tell if they were able to finally be in love openly or not. As to why they couldn’t be in love publicly, my first thought was maybe it was a social class thing, but then in the final chapter, the Beloved’s older brothers say, “We have a young sister, and her breasts are not yet grown.” Was the love forbidden because Solomon was an adult and the Beloved was a young girl who hadn’t gone through puberty yet? If so, doesn’t that make this whole book kind of creepy?

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1 Notes

Song of Solomon 8

8:1 If only you were to me like a brother, who was nursed at my mother’s breasts! Then, if I found you outside, I would kiss you, and no one would despise me.

8:2 I would lead you and bring you to my mother’s house— she who has taught me. I would give you spiced wine to drink, the nectar of my pomegranates.

8:3 His left arm is under my head and his right arm embraces me.

8:4 Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you: Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires.

8:5 Who is this coming up from the desert leaning on her lover? Under the apple tree I roused you; there your mother conceived you, there she who was in labor gave you birth.

8:6 Place me like a seal over your heart, like a seal on your arm; for love is as strong as death, its jealousy unyielding as the grave. It burns like blazing fire, like a mighty flame.

8:7 Many waters cannot quench love; rivers cannot wash it away. If one were to give all the wealth of his house for love, it would be utterly scorned.

Friends

8:8 We have a young sister, and her breasts are not yet grown. What shall we do for our sister for the day she is spoken for?

8:9 If she is a wall, we will build towers of silver on her. If she is a door, we will enclose her with panels of cedar.

Beloved

8:10 I am a wall, and my breasts are like towers. Thus I have become in his eyes like one bringing contentment.

8:11 Solomon had a vineyard in Baal Hamon; he let out his vineyard to tenants. Each was to bring for its fruit a thousand shekels of silver.

8:12 But my own vineyard is mine to give; the thousand shekels are for you, O Solomon, and two hundred are for those who tend its fruit.

Lover

8:13 You who dwell in the gardens with friends in attendance, let me hear your voice!

Beloved

8:14 Come away, my lover, and be like a gazelle or like a young stag on the spice-laden mountains.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 8:

Here we are at the end of Song of Solomon, and I’m left feeling a little disappointed. As the only book of its kind in the Bible (as far as I know), this could have been written much better. On top of this, I’ve been wondering this whole time why Solomon and his Beloved couldn’t just be together without being ridiculed. My first thought was maybe it was a social class thing, but then in this chapter, the Beloved’s older brothers say, “We have a young sister, and her breasts are not yet grown.” Was the love forbidden because Solomon was an adult and the Beloved was a young girl who hadn’t gone through puberty yet? If so, doesn’t that make this whole book kind of creepy?

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1 Notes

Song of Solomon 7

7:1 How beautiful your sandaled feet, O prince’s daughter! Your graceful legs are like jewels, the work of a craftsman’s hands.

7:2 Your navel is a rounded goblet that never lacks blended wine. Your waist is a mound of wheat encircled by lilies.

7:3 Your breasts are like two fawns, twins of a gazelle.

7:4 Your neck is like an ivory tower. Your eyes are the pools of Heshbon by the gate of Bath Rabbim. Your nose is like the tower of Lebanon looking toward Damascus.

7:5 Your head crowns you like Mount Carmel. Your hair is like royal tapestry; the king is held captive by its tresses.

7:6 How beautiful you are and how pleasing, O love, with your delights!

7:7 Your stature is like that of the palm, and your breasts like clusters of fruit.

7:8 I said, “I will climb the palm tree; I will take hold of its fruit.” May your breasts be like the clusters of the vine, the fragrance of your breath like apples,

Beloved

7:9 and your mouth like the best wine. May the wine go straight to my lover, flowing gently over lips and teeth.

7:10 I belong to my lover, and his desire is for me.

7:11 Come, my lover, let us go to the countryside, let us spend the night in the villages.

7:12 Let us go early to the vineyards to see if the vines have budded, if their blossoms have opened, and if the pomegranates are in bloom— there I will give you my love.

7:13 The mandrakes send out their fragrance, and at our door is every delicacy, both new and old, that I have stored up for you, my lover.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 7:

Solomon continues to sweet talk his Beloved, but pretty directly says that he wants to sleep with her, “Your stature is like that of the palm, and your breasts like clusters of fruit. I said, “I will climb the palm tree; I will take hold of its fruit.” The Beloved answers back that she’s ready, and proposes that they do it in a vineyard.

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Notes

Song of Solomon 6

Friends

6:1 Where has your lover gone, most beautiful of women? Which way did your lover turn, that we may look for him with you?

Beloved

6:2 My lover has gone down to his garden, to the beds of spices, to browse in the gardens and to gather lilies.

6:3 I am my lover’s and my lover is mine; he browses among the lilies.

Lover

6:4 You are beautiful, my darling, as Tirzah, lovely as Jerusalem, majestic as troops with banners.

6:5 Turn your eyes from me; they overwhelm me. Your hair is like a flock of goats descending from Gilead.

6:6 Your teeth are like a flock of sheep coming up from the washing. Each has its twin, not one of them is alone.

6:7 Your temples behind your veil are like the halves of a pomegranate.

6:8 Sixty queens there may be, and eighty concubines, and virgins beyond number;

6:9 but my dove, my perfect one, is unique, the only daughter of her mother, the favorite of the one who bore her. The maidens saw her and called her blessed; the queens and concubines praised her.

Friends

6:10 Who is this that appears like the dawn, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, majestic as the stars in procession?

Lover

6:11 I went down to the grove of nut trees to look at the new growth in the valley, to see if the vines had budded or the pomegranates were in bloom.

6:12 Before I realized it, my desire set me among the royal chariots of my people.

6:13 Come back, come back, O Shulammite; come back, come back, that we may gaze on you! Why would you gaze on the Shulammite as on the dance of Mahanaim?

Final Thoughts on Chapter 6:

The writing quality of Song of Solomon is starting to go downhill a little. Solomon is repeating some of his earlier compliments to his Beloved (i.e. “Your hair is like a flock of goats descending from Gilead” etc.) and I can’t seem to figure out why they can’t just get together. Is their love forbidden for some reason?

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Notes

Song of Solomon 5

Lover

5:1 I have come into my garden, my sister, my bride; I have gathered my myrrh with my spice. I have eaten my honeycomb and my honey; I have drunk my wine and my milk. Eat, O friends, and drink; drink your fill, O lovers.

Beloved

5:2 I slept but my heart was awake. Listen! My lover is knocking: “Open to me, my sister, my darling, my dove, my flawless one. My head is drenched with dew, my hair with the dampness of the night.”

5:3 I have taken off my robe— must I put it on again? I have washed my feet— must I soil them again?

5:4 My lover thrust his hand through the latch-opening; my heart began to pound for him.

5:5 I arose to open for my lover, and my hands dripped with myrrh, my fingers with flowing myrrh, on the handles of the lock.

5:6 I opened for my lover, but my lover had left; he was gone. My heart sank at his departure. I looked for him but did not find him. I called him but he did not answer.

5:7 The watchmen found me as they made their rounds in the city. They beat me, they bruised me; they took away my cloak, those watchmen of the walls!

5:8 O daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you— if you find my lover, what will you tell him? Tell him I am faint with love.

Friends

5:9 How is your beloved better than others, most beautiful of women? How is your beloved better than others, that you charge us so?

Beloved

5:10 My lover is radiant and ruddy, outstanding among ten thousand.

5:11 His head is purest gold; his hair is wavy and black as a raven.

5:12 His eyes are like doves by the water streams, washed in milk, mounted like jewels.

5:13 His cheeks are like beds of spice yielding perfume. His lips are like lilies dripping with myrrh.

5:14 His arms are rods of gold set with chrysolite. His body is like polished ivory decorated with sapphires.

5:15 His legs are pillars of marble set on bases of pure gold. His appearance is like Lebanon, choice as its cedars.

5:16 His mouth is sweetness itself; he is altogether lovely. This is my lover, this my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 5:

Solomon visits his beloved in the middle of the night, and apparently waited quite a while to sneak inside her house. He says to her, “My head is drenched with dew, my hair with the dampness of the night.” He makes the case that she should let him in, “I have taken off my robe— must I put it on again? I have washed my feet— must I soil them again?” When she went to let him in, he was suddenly gone. We’re left wondering what happened to him.

Side note: Solomon continually calls his beloved “My sister, my bride…” they’re not siblings, right?  

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Notes

Song of Solomon 4

Lover

4:1 How beautiful you are, my darling! Oh, how beautiful! Your eyes behind your veil are doves. Your hair is like a flock of goats descending from Mount Gilead.

4:2 Your teeth are like a flock of sheep just shorn, coming up from the washing. Each has its twin; not one of them is alone.

4:3 Your lips are like a scarlet ribbon; your mouth is lovely. Your temples behind your veil are like the halves of a pomegranate.

4:4 Your neck is like the tower of David, built with elegance; on it hang a thousand shields, all of them shields of warriors.

4:5 Your two breasts are like two fawns, like twin fawns of a gazelle that browse among the lilies.

4:6 Until the day breaks and the shadows flee, I will go to the mountain of myrrh and to the hill of incense.

4:7 All beautiful you are, my darling; there is no flaw in you.

4:8 Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, come with me from Lebanon. Descend from the crest of Amana, from the top of Senir, the summit of Hermon, from the lions’ dens and the mountain haunts of the leopards.

4:9 You have stolen my heart, my sister, my bride; you have stolen my heart with one glance of your eyes, with one jewel of your necklace.

4:10 How delightful is your love, my sister, my bride! How much more pleasing is your love than wine, and the fragrance of your perfume than any spice!

4:11 Your lips drop sweetness as the honeycomb, my bride; milk and honey are under your tongue. The fragrance of your garments is like that of Lebanon.

4:12 You are a garden locked up, my sister, my bride; you are a spring enclosed, a sealed fountain.

4:13 Your plants are an orchard of pomegranates with choice fruits, with henna and nard,

4:14 nard and saffron, calamus and cinnamon, with every kind of incense tree, with myrrh and aloes and all the finest spices.

4:15 You are a garden fountain, a well of flowing water streaming down from Lebanon.

Beloved

4:16 Awake, north wind, and come, south wind! Blow on my garden, that its fragrance may spread abroad. Let my lover come into his garden and taste its choice fruits.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 4:

The lovers continue their expression of love and lust for each other. Solomon lavishes the Beloved with compliments, “Your eyes behind your veil are doves” “Your lips are like a scarlet ribbon; your mouth is lovely” “Your two breasts are like two fawns, like twin fawns of a gazelle that browse among the lilies.” She responds by inviting him to taste her “choice fruits.” Wink, wink.

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Notes

Song of Solomon 3

3:1 All night long on my bed I looked for the one my heart loves; I looked for him but did not find him.

3:2 I will get up now and go about the city, through its streets and squares; I will search for the one my heart loves. So I looked for him but did not find him.

3:3 The watchmen found me as they made their rounds in the city. “Have you seen the one my heart loves?”

3:4 Scarcely had I passed them when I found the one my heart loves. I held him and would not let him go till I had brought him to my mother’s house, to the room of the one who conceived me.

3:5 Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you by the gazelles and by the does of the field: Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires.

3:6 Who is this coming up from the desert like a column of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and incense made from all the spices of the merchant?

3:7 Look! It is Solomon’s carriage, escorted by sixty warriors, the noblest of Israel,

3:8 all of them wearing the sword, all experienced in battle, each with his sword at his side, prepared for the terrors of the night.

3:9 King Solomon made for himself the carriage; he made it of wood from Lebanon.

3:10 Its posts he made of silver, its base of gold. Its seat was upholstered with purple, its interior lovingly inlaid by the daughters of Jerusalem.

3:11 Come out, you daughters of Zion, and look at King Solomon wearing the crown, the crown with which his mother crowned him on the day of his wedding, the day his heart rejoiced.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 3:

The Beloved lies restless in bed, longing for the touch of King Solomon all night, but he doesn’t come. In the morning, she goes out on a desperate search for him through the city, even asking watchmen she finds “Have you seen the one my heart loves?” She continues her search until suddenly, she smells a strong scent of myrrh and incense, and sees Solomon’s carriage approaching, which is guarded by sixty warriors and made of fine and expensive materials. She looks on at him in awe.

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Notes

Song of Solomon 2

Beloved

2:1 I am a rose of Sharon, a lily of the valleys.

Lover

2:2 Like a lily among thorns is my darling among the maidens.

Beloved

2:3 Like an apple tree among the trees of the forest is my lover among the young men. I delight to sit in his shade, and his fruit is sweet to my taste.

2:4 He has taken me to the banquet hall, and his banner over me is love.

2:5 Strengthen me with raisins, refresh me with apples, for I am faint with love.

2:6 His left arm is under my head, and his right arm embraces me.

2:7 Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you by the gazelles and by the does of the field: Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires.

2:8 Listen! My lover! Look! Here he comes, leaping across the mountains, bounding over the hills.

2:9 My lover is like a gazelle or a young stag. Look! There he stands behind our wall, gazing through the windows, peering through the lattice.

2:10 My lover spoke and said to me, “Arise, my darling, my beautiful one, and come with me.

2:11 See! The winter is past; the rains are over and gone.

2:12 Flowers appear on the earth; the season of singing has come, the cooing of doves is heard in our land.

2:13 The fig tree forms its early fruit; the blossoming vines spread their fragrance. Arise, come, my darling; my beautiful one, come with me.”

Lover

2:14 My dove in the clefts of the rock, in the hiding places on the mountainside, show me your face, let me hear your voice; for your voice is sweet, and your face is lovely.

2:15 Catch for us the foxes, the little foxes that ruin the vineyards, our vineyards that are in bloom.

Beloved

2:16 My lover is mine and I am his; he browses among the lilies.

2:17 Until the day breaks and the shadows flee, turn, my lover, and be like a gazelle or like a young stag on the rugged hills.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 2:

The “Lover” and his “Beloved” continue to caress each other both in words and physically. I liked this poetic line, “Strengthen me with raisins, refresh me with apples, for I am faint with love.” I am still very surprised that this book, which is borderline ancient erotica, was chosen to be included in the Bible. I don’t have a problem with it of course, but alongside all the books thus far, it definitely sticks out.

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Notes

Song of Solomon 1

1:1 Solomon’s Song of Songs.

Beloved

1:2 Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth— for your love is more delightful than wine.

1:3 Pleasing is the fragrance of your perfumes; your name is like perfume poured out. No wonder the maidens love you!

1:4 Take me away with you—let us hurry! Let the king bring me into his chambers. We rejoice and delight in you; we will praise your love more than wine. How right they are to adore you!

1:5 Dark am I, yet lovely, O daughters of Jerusalem, dark like the tents of Kedar, like the tent curtains of Solomon.

1:6 Do not stare at me because I am dark, because I am darkened by the sun. My mother’s sons were angry with me and made me take care of the vineyards; my own vineyard I have neglected.

1:7 Tell me, you whom I love, where you graze your flock and where you rest your sheep at midday. Why should I be like a veiled woman beside the flocks of your friends?

Friends

1:8 If you do not know, most beautiful of women, follow the tracks of the sheep and graze your young goats by the tents of the shepherds.

Lover

1:9 I liken you, my darling, to a mare harnessed to one of the chariots of Pharaoh.

1:10 Your cheeks are beautiful with earrings, your neck with strings of jewels.

1:11 We will make you earrings of gold, studded with silver.

Beloved

1:12 While the king was at his table, my perfume spread its fragrance.

1:13 My lover is to me a sachet of myrrh resting between my breasts.

1:14 My lover is to me a cluster of henna blossoms from the vineyards of En Gedi.

Lover

1:15 How beautiful you are, my darling! Oh, how beautiful! Your eyes are doves.

Beloved

1:16 How handsome you are, my lover! Oh, how charming! And our bed is verdant.

Lover

1:17 The beams of our house are cedars; our rafters are firs.

Final Thoughts on Chapter 1:

Whoa, where did this come from? Song of Solomon reads sort of like Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, where both lovers speak to each other in poetic longing. I’m wondering who let this book slip in the Bible as, so far, there isn’t any mention of God, and the lovers are getting a little dirty: “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth” “My lover is to me a sachet of myrrh resting between my breasts” etc. But hey, so far its a pleasant break. 

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